“We must reinvent mobility”

Some good points about #smartcity #sustainability and #health.

Transport Policy Matters

Michael_Cramer square CroppedMichael Cramer of the European Parliament’s Committee on Transport talks about the imbalance between transport modes and the lessons from “Dieselgate”.


A lot of innovation is happening in transport right now – headlines about self-driving cars and electric vehicles abound. Are we finally on the path towards sustainable mobility?

Cramer: Billions are still invested in forms of mobility that ruin our climate. And it’s still all about cars. Without reinventing mobility we will not be able to stop climate change. A veteran German politician, former Munich mayor Hans-Jochen Vogel, said it well as early as 1972: “Cars are murdering our cities. Those who sow streets will harvest traffic”. Even if one day all cars will be electric, they will still be murdering our cities. When all cars are self-driving, they will still be murdering our cities. We must reduce emissions, sure. But it’s not only about energy efficiency, we must also…

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Mobile content is much more than responsive design

Change Meme

Just Stop ItJust stop presenting desktop sites to mobile users.

The use of mobile phones has risen and for some uses has overtaken the use of a desktop. Companies have taken advantage of this in a big way, including online retailers. I’ve produced and translated screen captures to demonstrate the issue.

Firstly I received an SMS, telling me I could, via a link, choose a delivery time.

Just Stop It SMS
I clicked on the link and got a internet site with all my order information displayed and the proposed time of between 8am and 10pm. Well as I’d like to leave the house sometime during the day I clicked on the link to change the appointment, and here’s where it went a bit wrong…

Just Stop It… because a new page opened that was impossible to read.

Just Stop ItI could stretch the screen and make the change I needed (delivery between 9am and 1pm).

If you’re using…

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Your smarthome is dumber than you think

Tech Talks

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There is a lot of talk about how the Internet of Things (IoT) is making our homes smarter, which effectively boils down to making our lives more comfortable, reducing energy consumption and creating opportunities that were previously inconceivable. But as our homes become “smarter” from a utilitarian perspective, they are becoming dumber from a security point of view, and they are opening up some pretty nice opportunities for burglars, cyber-criminals, and anyone who wants to do us harm to carry out their evil deeds.

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Panama, privacy and power…

Paul Bernal's Blog

David Cameron’s first reaction to the questions about his family’s involvement with the Mossack Fonseca leaks was that it was a ‘private matter’ – something that was greeted with a chorus of disapproval from his political opponents and large sections of both the social and ‘traditional’ media. Privacy scholars and advocates, however, were somewhat muted – and quite rightly, because there are complex issues surrounding privacy here, issues that should at the very least make us pause and think. Privacy, in the view of many people, is a human right. It is included in one form or another in all the major human rights declarations and conventions. This, for example, is Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights:

“Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence.”

Everyone. Not just the people we like. Indeed, the test of your commitment…

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The next Silicon Valley is emerging everywhere

When we first started The Next Silicon Valley several years ago, it was based on places trying to create their own Silicon Valley like innovation ecosystem. Now, it’s no longer about the label or the question that we are often asked, ‘where is the next Silicon Valley’. Instead, the debate has moved on.
One of the key aspects of creating successful innovation ecosystems is the collaboration aspect. The Economist Intelligence Unit has articulated this well in a survey ahead of its own innovation conference in Chicago. In its report, ‘Innovation Clusters: Why companies are better together’, it talks about the success factors that have shaped five key clusters – London’s silicon roundabout, Singapore, Estonia, Boulder (USA), and Bangalore (India).

Find out more
Source: The next Silicon Valley is emerging everywhere

No mobile marketing strategy, no teen customers.

Millennials are having a party, but it seems the invitations for most teen retailers never hit their mailboxes. Perhaps that’s because such invites would’ve been issued via mobile phone.

At a time when younger generations are spending upward of 80 hours a month on their mobile devices, several apparel brands are missing out on a commerce opportunity that led to $35 billion in U.S. sales last year. Such brands have been slow to enter and innovate in the mobile sector, a sluggishness that experts say could be costing them sales, some are now scrambling for relevance among their tech-minded consumers. Some have recently added e-commerce capabilities and curated music through their mobile apps, though others haven’t gotten even that far.

The stark simplicity of the teen brand app experience is amplified when compared with shopping apps from retailers such as Target or and Sephora. Those brands have invested huge amounts in infrastructure for loyalty-rewarding coupons and virtual reality elements that are winning over consumers. Earlier this year, Sephora rolled out to its already-popular app a virtual try-on feature for lipstick.

With a growing population of mobile shoppers — 40% of consumers used their phones last year to search for what they wanted, compared with 36% in 2014, according to Accenture — there’s quite a bit at stake. And convincing a consumer, especially a notoriously fickle teen, to download an app and dedicate precious phone storage to a brand is difficult. The majority of shoppers, 73%, have two or fewer retail apps on their phones, online coupon site RetailMeNot found in a recent study.

2015 is a banner year for moviegoing and cinema advertising. North American box office sales are well on the way to topping the $10.9 billion record set in 2013. Even so, some analysts question whether the silver screen can continue to deliver a golden opportunity for marketers who want to advertise at the movies. Here are seven top myths about moviegoing and why savvy marketers know to ignore them. Brought to you by NCM — America’s Movie Network.

 

Teen-focused brands understand the issue, but are still playing catch-up; they’re reluctant to devote big dollars to mobile. The Aéropostale app, for example, seems to be exactly the same as the brand’s mobile site, though it, oddly, features a different logo — a bare-bones endeavor.

Abercrombie’s app offers a slightly more optimized experience, with some branded photography and an easy-to-find playlist with its own tab. American Eagle offers the most feature-rich experience. The app is more brand-immersive with photography, and also dabbles in omnichannel capabilities by providing a bar-code scanner for in-store items. Like Abercrombie, the app has its own radio station, but the button is hard to find.

Shoppers would likely need a more compelling reason to download any one of these apps — radio is nice, but it doesn’t help a brand stand out. Ideally, an app should showcase a strong brand voice with contributions from fans via social media, and also offer integrated features for brick-and-mortar shopping.

Abercrombie and American Eagle are working on such ideas. New York-based Aéropostale, which has used social and mobile messaging in the past to market its brand, declined to comment. The struggling retailer — Aéro has reported two consecutive years of losses and recently said it will lay off 13% of its corporate workforce — has made few recent updates to its three-year-old app.

This post is a light version of Adrianne Pasquarelli’s great article: Why retailers are missing out on mobile with millenials.